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Neil Roy
Member #2,229
April 2002
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bam... it was a TV show... only TV... not reality. But yes, DEFINITELY my favourite character, played perfectly. In many of the stories he actually helped. In the final two episodes of TNG, he actually was a huge help in a problem the captain caused.

But... IT... IS... ONLY... FICTION... it's not real... I love him, lots of laughs. John played him perfectly. My wife and I both loved all the episodes with him in it, especially on Star Trek Voyager (my favourite ST series), like when he appeared in bed with the captain. ;D

You people need to lighten up!

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Edit: as for your comments about the God I believe in, I don't see what in fuck that has to do with a damn TV show! Get a life!

Elias
Member #358
May 2000

bamccaig said:

Q was an appreciated character for his stir of things, but I think you'd have to be mentally unstable to pick him as your favorite.

Never thought I'd have anything in common with Neil - but he was my favorite character as well! In a way he was the driving force behind the entire show - doesn't he even appear in the very first episode?

The episode where he changes the past so Picard would not have had the accident causing him to get an artificial heart is just genius.

--
"Either help out or stop whining" - Evert

Edgar Reynaldo
Member #8,592
May 2007
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Neil Roy said:

It was obviously one of those moments when the baby grabbed the cat and the parents found the pose cute. You need to see the cuteness and humour in this, not your secret fantasies. :P

Yes. How cute. Someone else's naked child and a caption stating he's sodomizing an animal. How cute. Sorry but I don't find naked children appealing. Dr. Spock does not approve of your depraved sense of humor.

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Neil Roy
Member #2,229
April 2002
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Elias said:

Never thought I'd have anything in common with Neil - but he was my favorite character as well! In a way he was the driving force behind the entire show - doesn't he even appear in the very first episode?

Actually, you're right. Q was in the very first episode, putting the human race on trial, and the final episode that you mentioned was the conclusion to that trial if you watch it. That was the last episode(s) of the series. So you make a good point.

In any event, I take real life seriously, not fiction on TV. When I can find something on Star Trek my wife likes too, when she normally hates the show, that's a good thing! And I got her to like Voyager (the only one she likes) and Q so. I don't honestly know how anyone could not like him, John DeLancie played him perfectly with lots of laughs.

Yes. How cute. Someone else's naked child and a caption stating he's sodomizing an animal. How cute. Sorry but I don't find naked children appealing. Dr. Spock does not approve of your depraved sense of humor.

Sorry, butt, I found it funny. It was meant as humour for obvious reasons.

As for Spock... he's a fictional character. And I don't seek approval anyhow, I found it funny whether you liked it or not. Bu-bye! ;D

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Edgar Reynaldo
Member #8,592
May 2007
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bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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I mostly agree with Neil's humor in this thread to my surprise. That said, Q is not meant to be a likable character. He's an asshole. You grow to like him over time, as you realize he isn't going to actually destroy the crew or ship, but you still don't like him, as doesn't either captain. The actor, of course, does a wonderful job portraying him, and for that I give kudos. The character is a misguided prick.

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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Toys R Us is filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy in the US. I don't wanna grow up. I'm a Toys R Us kid. :(

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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Toys today are shit. There's no imagination left. They all take 8 batteries every 4 hours, and they tell you what you're playing. It's no fun. My young nephew just pulls you to his toy room and says, "I have this, and this, and this, and this, ..." He doesn't really play with any of it. It's fucking depressing. I used to ignore what the character was on an action figure and invent my own self, and play for hours... No batteries required.

Anybody ever have those matchcar town play mats as kids? Basically it was a little mat with a mini town on it with roads that fit your toy cars. Just a generic town. No branding. Mostly roads. There were all the essentials. A store, a police station, fire station, etc. Thing is, they still make these today, but now the buildings are so 3D that the buildings are 60-80% of the mat. There are just a few crappy loops around it. How the Hell is a kid supposed to imagine a story out of that? Most of the mat caters to the one part of the equation he has no avatar for: people outside of cars. And you can't go inside buildings really. That's all just imaginary. Factor in the fact that most kids are playing with iPhones and Androids at 8 months of age and have the attention span of a rock. They don't have imaginations anymore.

It's just a very sad world. No wonder toy stores are suffering. They don't sell good toys anymore.

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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I think the cause of the bankruptcy can be pinned on a general struggle to compete online with the likes of Amazon more than anything else.

While on the subject of toys, I remember buying a Red Power Ranger action figure when I was five. It even included a motorcycle for the figure to ride on. It was awesome. I spent so many hours making up stories with it, imagining it doing jumps and tricks off of buildings, etc. It required no batteries, which was great. I wonder whatever happened to it... Strange how things that once meant a lot to you can fade into obscurity as you age. :-/

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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Append:

When and if I have kids they won't be getting electronic toys. They'll get non-electronic toys that don't light up, make sounds, or anything like that. You have to imagine the magic. Your imagination will do way better than $70 at a toy store ever could. The real fun is in the imagination. They also won't be playing with any mobile phones, tablets, or computers until they're a little bit older. I loved playing NES when I was 4 or 5, but in hindsight I'm not sure that it encouraged the best me that I could be. Fortunately my parents limited my usage of it, though to get around their rules I'd usually wake up quietly at like 5 or 6 AM to go play.

I'm on the fence about letting my kids play video games. I don't think video games are themselves harmful, though I think in this world kids don't use their imagination enough. Similar to the toys, the games are so detailed that they kind of make it hard to imagine your own story (I remember identifying this problem even in my teen years where certain games were sort of locked down to the developer's narrative). As a child and teen I played Driver on PlayStation countless times in free-mode imagining my own story. While it would probably have been far more beneficial to just go play with friends and learn social skills, I think that playing games that don't even afford you the freedom to reinvent the story would be even worse than if you were playing games that were loosely enough structured to let you imagine your own game within them.

Insert: I should emphasize that I think that the right video games would encourage the imagination to develop and grow, but video games don't encourage social skills. That's where I am lacking, and I can't be sure if it's my nature or if it was influenced by my exposure to computers growing up from a young age. Part of me thinks that playing video games did somewhat hinder my social development, but at the same time, they also made up in some ways for what wasn't there for one reason or another. You can always introduce your kids to video games if you discover them naturally lacking social skills. :P I've noticed "social" people don't play video games the way that I do, and while I insist that they're wrong and stupid and ugly for it, I can see how it would be beneficial for my kids to have better social skills than I do, perhaps at the expense of being (brace yourself) less of a geek. :-X

Perhaps that could be inspiration to some of the game designers on these message boards. As important as immersion is for a good game, a really useful thing to achieve is a game that doesn't get in a child's way if they start to imagine their own game out of it (i.e., the game behaves in a predictable way that the child can build on, and doesn't necessarily break the immersion of their imaginary game either). Even if it's just a special free game mode like Driver had I think it's important to have.

Neil Roy
Member #2,229
April 2002
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bamccaig said:

When and if I have kids they won't be getting electronic toys.

Some of my favourite toys as a child were the leggos and a mechano set, things where you are creative. I think they make the best toys for a child. Nothing electric, helps them become creative. I didn't have a lot of them though, my friends and I used to like creating our own things.

My father bought me a Radio Shack 200-n-1 electronic kits which I recall liking so much i took it to camp with me! ;D... it taught you about electronics and you built your own things with it by wiring up various components. That love of electronics is what lead to computer programming later on.

I think the best toys are ones that encourage creativity, preferably non-violent.

I like what John Romero did with his son, he taught him to program and helped his son create a video game. If my wife and I could have children (we can't) that would be one option I would pursue.

Well, Neil, the point is, not everyone has the same sense of humor you do.

I tell you what, in the interest of peace and happiness, I'll tone it down a bit. Perhaps I have been too crass. <shrug> I have a strong sense of humour though, anyone that knows me, knows I laugh a lot and love to joke around, I try not to get too serious (except about certain topics I feel strongly about of course). Anyhow... I'll put on my serious face...

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Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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So I tried out Microsoft Edge today. It works pretty well, but it has loads of input lag when trying to play games written in JavaScript. Keyboard inputs sometimes get stuck or don't even register at all. It's abysmal. Granted, I'm using Edge 38, so maybe this is fixed in Edge 40. But holy cow, I can't believe they'd screw up something simple like event listeners. :o

Neil Roy
Member #2,229
April 2002
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Woohoo! I survived September 23rd! ;D

I think I need a T-Shirt with that on it.

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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Neil Roy said:

Woohoo! I survived September 23rd! ;D

Still an hour to go for me. :-/

ZoriaRPG
Member #16,714
July 2017
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I also agree. Some of is occasionally have things come up in life that prevents us from checking in regularly.

Why are threads locking on their own anyway? Can't thread locks be done by moderators, or by OPs?

Can someone unlock this for us, please:

https://www.allegro.cc/forums/thread/616990/2

I would rather respond to things [b]in that thread[/b] than start a new, pointless thread.

Edgar Reynaldo
Member #8,592
May 2007
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Neil Roy
Member #2,229
April 2002
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;D

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Edgar Reynaldo
Member #8,592
May 2007
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Neil Roy
Member #2,229
April 2002
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What, there was an apocalypse and I missed it? Dang, not again.

Yeah, there was another one for September 23rd (search Youtube). There was also one for Sept 23, 2015 if you remember that, to do with the "four blood moons", I called that a false prophecy back then and again this time. This time they were mixing astrology with the Bible which I found unbelievable.

Anyhow, seen that pic posted and I got a kick out of it. I want a T-shirt that says "I survived September 23rd... again" ;)

Polybios
Member #12,293
October 2010

I love this quote:

This is the age of protected feelings purchased at the cost of permanent infantilization.

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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I really do feel like the public (perhaps after growing up in an age of "everyone is a winner") has become adult infants.

And the stats basically prove it. Millennials "move out", "lose their virginity" and "do drugs" all less than the previous generation. I'm all for "not doing drugs" but basically being afraid of the world--except through a computer screen--does not make a healthy long-term, fulfilling life.

Perhaps that's why they're so angry. They've thrown away everything the previous generation held sacred, and then became frustrated when there was nothing left.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Gideon Weems
Member #3,925
October 2003

That was a worthwhile read, Polybios. I was disappointed, however, when the author acknowledged journalism's unique importance in the private sector (as opposed to "trucking or food services," which tend not to influence public opinion) but immediately doused it with a couple of lame jokes. (Furthermore, I would argue that food services greatly affect public opinion regarding health matters.) The author then goes on to beseech journalists to solve the problem by performing their duties responsibly... but without having freed journalism from capitalistic influence (profitability via "high-carb, low-protein populist pap"), how is this supposed to make a difference? The author's call to arms is tantamount to asking nicely, and I can't seem to remember the last time the free market chose "asking nicely" over money.

Codification of logical debate, exercised as part of grade school curriculum, would better benefit society--codification being important, as teachers themselves often succumb to fallacy. Such a generation would have a better chance growing up with an appetite for meaningful journalism (as opposed to empty "identity politics") and might actually support meaningful journalism through capitalism, as opposed to against it in an unending, uphill battle.

Otherwise, you have to topple capitalism itself, as capitalism--by definition--follows money. Pretending it might do otherwise brings about no change and does more harm than good, like telling a cancer patient to get plenty of sleep instead of removing the tumor.

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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No replies in nearly three whole days? :o We're getting lazy. :-/

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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The Orville is amazing. Episode 3 is EXACTLY like one of the best TNG episodes. Episode 4 is pretty good but more predictable.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Bruce Perry
Member #270
April 2000

I was supposed to be climbing Kilimanjaro now, but a slight condition has prevented me :(

On the plus side, I had occasion to fly with easyJet again, and apart from the airport being harder to get to, it's soooooo much better than Ryanair in every other way. Cuter planes, better seat material, better support, brighter and more spacious interior, better window height, better sound insulation, smoother operation, crew happy enough to socialise with each other, no stupid landing jingle... :)

Speaking of the journey to the airport, a lovely old lady at a bus stop said to another lovely old lady that it was sunny, wasn't it, and a tall, thin, confident guy with a slightly great big bushy goatee, short hair pointing upwards and sunglasses on top said it's because of global climate change, nice that people are finally noticing, and wrong that everyone is supporting all these f%&#ing governments. He was very keen to point out that he's a roofer (he was clearly very proud of this) and he noticed it too. I told him I didn't think we had a choice, did we, and asked what he would do? He paused and then told me, "To be honest, you seem a little camp, mate, to be having a conversation with me." It was a little threatening in the moment, but as soon as he was gone, it was hilarious. He definitely seemed a few tiles short of a roof to me. I've met bad roofers before too - what is it with roofers?!

--
Bruce "entheh" Perry [ Web site | DUMB | Set Up Us The Bomb !!! | Balls ]
Programming should be fun. That's why I hate C and C++.
The brxybrytl has you.

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