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bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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Happy Easter. I'm sorry it's over. But I got to see most of the people that matter most, and got a good long talk with my mom out of it. :) Alas, now I have to try to get to bed at a decent hour so I can wake up and be rested for work tomorrow. :-/

Onewing
Member #6,152
August 2005
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Happy National High Five Day!

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Solo-Games.org | My Tech Blog: The Digital Helm

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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And a happy "self high five" day to lonely people! :D

Bruce Perry
Member #270
April 2000

If you're lonely and you know it, clap your hands?

--
Bruce "entheh" Perry [ Web site | DUMB | Set Up Us The Bomb !!! | Balls ]
Programming should be fun. That's why I hate C and C++.
The brxybrytl has you.

taron 
Member #10,584
January 2009
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High five day coincides with Hitler's birthday?

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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That and it's marijuana day! :o The two together make for a REALLY high five. ;)

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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Bruce Perry
Member #270
April 2000

Marijuana fans - can you find a way to enjoy it without filling the air with it? It's a bugbear of mine (along with cigarettes)...

Today's random tip: pay $22 a year to IMSLP and you get access to Naxos's classical music streaming (desktop and mobile), which is wonderful. My latest discovery on there is Gilbert and Sullivan's The Pirates of Penzance. <3

--
Bruce "entheh" Perry [ Web site | DUMB | Set Up Us The Bomb !!! | Balls ]
Programming should be fun. That's why I hate C and C++.
The brxybrytl has you.

Aaron Bolyard
Member #7,537
July 2006
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I made a debugger for my behavior tree library.

I'm proud of it. Was very easy to integrate, since the process method of each behavior tree node is wrapped in coroutine that yields when working, I was trivially able to insert a debug hook and yield until resume without breaking anything. Even nodes that normally don't yield just work.

It also handles remapping line numbers between MoonScript and Lua, which is nice.

{"name":"610862","src":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/3\/2\/3237af673057737e4292fe2a719b117f.png","w":1286,"h":629,"tn":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/3\/2\/3237af673057737e4292fe2a719b117f"}610862

Not the prettiest thing, but it seems to do the job just fine.

But damn, writing the GUI code is the most boring thing I've done in weeks. I hate two types of programming: GUI and web development.

Gideon Weems
Member #3,925
October 2003

I hate two types of programming: GUI and web development.

I share similar sentiments but do have high hopes for nuklear and Pyramid.

Marijuana fans - can you find a way to enjoy it without filling the air with it?

I share similar sentiments but do have high friends.

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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GUI programming is frustrating because it's so much work for very little results. It's a lot of work to make a bad interface. A good interface is like impractical time investment.

Web programming is similar, but not nearly as bad. The hard part about Web programming is browser compatibility. The key there is doing everything server-side and avoiding JavaScript, which is the main culprit for incompatibility. There are stable and well supported libraries to provide a little bit of client-side convenience without breaking anyone's user experience.

There are definite advantages to Web development. I don't think many of us see it as their dream job, but it's a pretty reliable revenue stream. Most clients won't accept console programs, and GUIs are more expensive than Web is. And GUIs can suffer the same compatibility issues depending on supported platforms.

As for marijuana, I don't particularly hate the smell from a distance. I have a neighbour (or two?) that smoke it, presumably by prescription, and it doesn't really bother me to smell it occasionally. If it was 24/7 it might be different. Certainly it's more offputting when the guy sitting next to you in the office wreaks of it. :( I probably would be more tolerant if they shared! :(

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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I find it interesting to hear people's thoughts of Web development. I got into coding because of Web development, so the Web is my first love, I guess.

Compatibility issues were certainly rampant 10 years ago, but it has much improved these past few years. Especially with browsers that auto-update, compatibility is not as bad as it once was. The top modern browsers all support most of the same technologies. HTML5 is pretty much implemented across the board now, as is CSS3 (with a few subtle exceptions). As for JavaScript, that has gotten a lot better, too. I used to stay away from JavaScript for the most part because it was slow and inconsistent (mostly with IE--damn you, IE!), but it is not bad these days. I actually recently got back into JavaScript, and I really like how it has improved. It is pretty quick these days (though it likely will never be as fast as native code for obvious reasons), and compatibility is pretty good. It is really only with the experimental or newly drafted APIs where you will run into issue. And mobile JavaScript has much improved in the past few years, too. In short, I like JavaScript now.

As for back-end stuff, that is a breeze and really always has been (in my opinion). PHP and MySQL is pretty available virtually everywhere, and the stuff just works. PHP has its flaws, but it gets the job done. I have done a lot of work with PHP and enjoy it. You can even write back-end code in JavaScript now with Node.js. :o

But anyway, I agree with GUI programming. I try my hand at it every now and again, and each time I leave mostly empty-handed and frustrated. As you said, bamccaig, it is a lot of work for very little. Such little return on investment. I prefer CLI anyway, which is one of the things that attracted me to Linux. The command line is often faster, lighter, and more convenient than GUI. However, I prefer browsing the Web and checking my emails in a GUI setting.

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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However, I prefer browsing the Web and checking my emails in a GUI setting.

The way I look at it is this: if the data involves graphics then a GUI is often desirable, albeit, it can still be a GUI designed for heavy keyboard use. The Web is a good candidate for a GUI. You can browse the Web in text, and good Web sites work fine in text, but graphics heavy sites are useless in text, and most poorly designed sites are too. A GUI just makes things easier in the modern Web.

Email, on the other hand, I actually prefer in text. Most email content is text, at least worthwhile content. Most of the graphics are just tracking beacons, or at best useless noise. Mutt, my preferred client, actually tends to do various things better too. It has better thread grouping than any GUI I've seen, it produces better outputs that are more accessible than most GUI and Web clients, and it supports things like PGP easily. If you haven't used a text client for mail give it a whirl. You might like it. It helps immensely if you have a good text-based text editor too.

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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Does Mutt easily handle sending / downloading attachments? I use attachments quite frequently.

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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Relatively easily. After you've composed the message in your editor and quit your editor you are returned to Mutt to view the metadata of the message. As I recall, you type 'a' to add an attachment and then have to type in the path. Or you can press '?' or tab to access a sort of text based file manager to browse for one. Mutt has been around for decades and was probably written, patched, used, and maintained by some of the godfathers of the Internet. It likely handles mail standards more correctly than most user agents. :)

{"name":"610863","src":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/0\/5\/05900c31ef1f21b8a192570cc46b701e.png","w":1010,"h":511,"tn":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/0\/5\/05900c31ef1f21b8a192570cc46b701e"}610863
(Note the prompt at the bottom of the first screenshot, that's after typing 'a')

{"name":"610864","src":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/6\/e\/6ea9c6b7f01911323ab7101d778c2597.png","w":1011,"h":510,"tn":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/6\/e\/6ea9c6b7f01911323ab7101d778c2597"}610864

Append:

Downloading them is relatively easily. I believe you type 'v' to view attached files and then select one as you would expect. If it's plain text or something that Mutt has been configured to know how to open it will just open normally in a view pane of Mutt (or run an external program as configured). Otherwise, you can indeed save it to a file so you can open it externally. I honestly don't deal with many attachments though so I'm not an attachment wizard. :)

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
avatar

Interesting. I think I'll give Mutt a try then.

Gideon Weems
Member #3,925
October 2003

If you are serious about trying out mutt, I must warn you that its configuration has been known to take lifetimes.

Regarding attachments: You can also add "Attach: /home/alex/reticulating_splines.wav" to the email header (if edit_headers is set). A file manager key binding for prepending "Attach: " to a path and copying the result to the system clipboard makes this very fast. Now that I think about it, a file manager could even have a binding that automatically places an "Attach: " string in a new email...

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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Thanks for the warning. I'll try it out tomorrow sometime. For now I'll sleep.

Also...

{"name":"Gestures.jpg","src":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/c\/6\/c66ee83f38e91ec7dab35e90a9960e77.jpg","w":400,"h":600,"tn":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/c\/6\/c66ee83f38e91ec7dab35e90a9960e77"}Gestures.jpg

I got your nose! Now pay up, or you'll never smell again! >:( ;)

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
avatar

With both Mutt and Vim, I suggest you don't spend decades trying to figure out your ideal first config. Instead, Google for some examples and base your rc file on those. Look around for the things you want from a default config, but generally look for a beginner friendly config. Just get using the software and once you're comfortable you can worry about making it work the way you want it to.

Bruce Perry
Member #270
April 2000

Eric - apparently, the gesture you posted is the Greek equivalent of a middle finger :)

--
Bruce "entheh" Perry [ Web site | DUMB | Set Up Us The Bomb !!! | Balls ]
Programming should be fun. That's why I hate C and C++.
The brxybrytl has you.

Gideon Weems
Member #3,925
October 2003

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
avatar

Eric - apparently, the gesture you posted is the Greek equivalent of a middle finger :)

So it means "?!#@ you, I got your nose!" then, right? :D

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
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bamccaig is a beautiful person. :-*

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
avatar

Eric Johnson
Member #14,841
January 2013
avatar

What the...? That's weird. I didn't even think that was possible. :o

I clicked the "Add Reply" button, but it didn't do anything the first time, so I clicked it again. My bad. :-X

Edit: I edited the duplicate post so it's not a duplicate anymore. ;)

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