Allegro.cc - Online Community

Allegro.cc Forums » Programming Questions » "Average" blending

This thread is locked; no one can reply to it. rss feed Print
 1   2 
"Average" blending
RPG Hacker
Member #12,492
January 2011
avatar

I just have to say I haven't yet used a gui interface to a version control system that actually worked reasonably well day to day.

Maybe you should give Plastic a try. It's what we use at work and so far it's the best version control system I've worked with, even better than Git (with or without GUI). It's commercial software, though, but I think it's free for private use. In any case, I really prefer that one over any other version control I've used so far.

Thomas Fjellstrom
Member #476
June 2000
avatar

Is it a gui to an existing VCS? or is it its own thing?

Plastic SCM said:

Teams working on large projects (>300k files) and unmergeable content.

Doesn't unmergable mean something is horribly broken?

--
Thomas Fjellstrom - [website] - [email] - [Allegro Wiki] - [Allegro TODO]
"If you can't think of a better solution, don't try to make a better solution." -- weapon_S
"The less evidence we have for what we believe is certain, the more violently we defend beliefs against those who don't agree" -- https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/592870205409353730

RPG Hacker
Member #12,492
January 2011
avatar

Is it a gui to an existing VCS? or is it its own thing?

I'm not sure, but I think it's its own thing. At least I don't think it's based on any of the wider known version control systems.

Quote:

Doesn't unmergable mean something is horribly broken?

I'm not sure from where you quoted that, but I'd assume they're refering to binary files here (or something like that). Normally Plastic doesn't have any problems with merging source files and is, in fact, really good at it. A lot better than Git, in fact (at least from my experience so far). That is mostly because it is really good at finding differences between files, much better than Git, and it is better at setting these differences into a correct context. Even when there are merge conflicts, which I rarely had so far, Plastic provides good tools for solving these merge conflicts (that is, a good editor that clearly visualises the conflicts and even makes suggestions on what it thinks the desired merge result). Plastic can even keep track of moved and renamed files, which I don't think Git can. Git just considers these "deleted" in one place and "added" in another place. I have come across a few situations where this was useful. Branches in Plastic also work like a charm, to me, again, a little bit better than in Git, since it's much easier to branch and merge back stuff and more. And it's easy to work on different branches simulatneously with Plastic, I haven't tried this with Git, but I'd assume you'd need to maintain each branch/workspace yourself with Git, whereas in Plastic you only need a single workspace and the client will do everything for you when you need to switch branches. You can even switch back to a certain changeset on a branch with just a click in case you want to test if something worked in an older version that doesn't work anymore. In Git it's usually a bit more evolved to go back to an older commit and test everything on that one.

Basically, to sum it up, I consider Plastic a more convenient alternative to Git. It can do everything Git can, plus a few more things, but thanks to a great GUI everything is a lot more user-friendly, faster and straightforward. And now we're just programmers talking here. Imagine you're working on a team with artists, game designers etc. Artists really aren't the kind of people who can easily work with command-line tools. They'll especially benefit from a nice and easy-to-use GUI version control system. So far, I've never experienced any of the artists here having any problems with Plastic, whereas I remember Git (and even Github for Windows) drive multiple artists (and even programmers) nuts back when we used it for our student project.

Thomas Fjellstrom
Member #476
June 2000
avatar

I'm not sure from where you quoted that, but I'd assume they're refering to binary files here (or something like that).

They have a separate bullet point for binary files.

I forgot to check, does it have linux support? And does it work with Kdevelop or any other IDE I might choose to use?

--
Thomas Fjellstrom - [website] - [email] - [Allegro Wiki] - [Allegro TODO]
"If you can't think of a better solution, don't try to make a better solution." -- weapon_S
"The less evidence we have for what we believe is certain, the more violently we defend beliefs against those who don't agree" -- https://twitter.com/neiltyson/status/592870205409353730

RPG Hacker
Member #12,492
January 2011
avatar

I forgot to check, does it have linux support?

We're using it on Mac with X11 and it's working perfectly. Didn't test on Linux since we currently have no Linux projects in development, but I'd assume it should work all the same. At least according to the documentation, the client supports Windows, Mac and various Linux distributions.

Quote:

And does it work with Kdevelop or any other IDE I might choose to use?

Can't say anything about that since I never use the direct IDE integration of any version control system. I usually use the Plastic client to commit stuff or update my workspace. The Plastic client is quite fast, though. I think a lot faster than the Github for Windows client, but I have never used that one at work, so I don't know if it's actually slow or only on my computer. In any case, starting Plastic and commiting your changes usually doesn't take too long, so that's why I never really missed any kind of direct IDE integration.

 1   2 


Go to: