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my first bike
juvinious
Member #5,145
October 2004
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I suggest you pick up the book Twist of the Wrist II. Excellent read more inclined towards the street than the track and will help you be much better biker.

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Paintown

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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bamccaig said:

The Kawasaki Ninja 250R goes from 0-60 in under 8 seconds, the quarter mile in 16 seconds, and has a top speed of 154 km/h (95 mph). That's plenty for a first street motorcycle. It'll more than keep up with traffic and it hopefully won't even kill me doing it.

I'm going to tell you from first-hand experience, if you're not light-weight and/or planning on doing highway travel, get a (slightly) bigger bike. The 250 holds around 10,000 RPM at 70 MPH. Any idea how much vibration comes out of an engine at 10,000 RPM? You'll rattle your teeth out of their sockets if you drive on the highway for more than 30 minutes. Your joints will physically ache.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
"Political Correctness is fascism disguised as manners" --George Carlin

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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I'm going to tell you from first-hand experience, if you're not light-weight and/or planning on doing highway travel, get a (slightly) bigger bike. The 250 holds around 10,000 RPM at 70 MPH. Any idea how much vibration comes out of an engine at 10,000 RPM? You'll rattle your teeth out of their sockets if you drive on the highway for more than 30 minutes. Your joints will physically ache.

I'm light weight (125 lbs) and I only have about a 20 minute drive on the highway. The highway is officially 55 mph (though people drive closer to 65 mph).

** EDIT **

Insurance through my current broker (liability and theft)(assuming an M1 license):

  • 2008 Honda CBR125R: CAD$1100/year.

  • 2008 Yamaha V-Star 250: CAD$1200/year.

  • 2009 Kawasaki Ninja (*cue gasp from broker*) 250R: CAD$1200/year.

I'm leaning towards the Ninja... :-/ My dad seems to be leaning hard towards the V-Star though... This could be interesting.

Matthew Leverton
Supreme Loser
January 1999
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My insurance is $20/month. Yours shouldn't be too much higher...

I wonder if its similar to how I steer when I'm riding with no hands. Of course I mostly just use my own weight to handle the turning.

Countersteering requires hands to steer in the "opposite" direction. There's no way to turn quickly at mid to high speeds by just leaning. You can make wide turns by leaning and shifting weight, but countersteering is absolutely required for real turns.

On a bicycle, I think the learned behavior is a quick twitch in the opposite direction, followed by a lean, and turning in the same direction.

Everybody does it... except for the kids just learning how to ride a bike. Why do you think they crash on turns at the beginning? Because they haven't figured out countersteering and their parents probably aren't smart enough to tell them about it.

Around 30mph, it seems to be very pronounced and easy to do. As soon as you turn in the opposite direction (which is natural), the bike dips toward the curve. By shifting your weight, you can maintain a good speed.

If you cannot convince yourself of it, try steering with one hand at minimum speeds of 10-12 mph. Think about which way you want to go and push in that direction.

jhuuskon
Member #302
April 2000
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Bambam, I thought of an elaborate and lengthy explanation exposing your flawed reasoning but chose not to since it's probably not going to make any difference.

So instead I'm just going to reiterate: You're a goddamn wuss. Riding easy on a 174hp Hayabusa isn't in any way different from a 21hp 1983 Yamaha RD125LC, but the extra horsepower and torque allow you to accelerate out from some nasty situations that would result in a crash on a 125cc. Even the 70-something hp of the SV gives you that benefit but a small displacement 4-stroke won't. Come on, grow a pair!

You don't deserve my sig.

Arthur Kalliokoski
Second in Command
February 2005
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The only way Trump is going to be involved in a landslide is if the land surrounding the White House collapses into the Earth's core. -- bamccaig

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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video

I really like the part about feeling comfortable running as fast as you can and just throwing yourself at the pavement. ;D Funny he didn't actually mention a helmet though... :P

jhuuskon said:

Bambam, I thought of an elaborate and lengthy explanation exposing your flawed reasoning but chose not to since it's probably not going to make any difference.

So instead I'm just going to reiterate: You're a goddamn wuss. Riding easy on a 174hp Hayabusa isn't in any way different from a 21hp 1983 Yamaha RD125LC, but the extra horsepower and torque allow you to accelerate out from some nasty situations that would result in a crash on a 125cc. Even the 70-something hp of the SV gives you that benefit but a small displacement 4-stroke won't. Come on, grow a pair!

Truth be told, the main reason I'm looking at smaller bikes is because they're cheaper. A lot cheaper. And easier to find. The whole reason I'm looking into motorcycles right now is because ML showed me how affordable a bike can be.

The insurance is also a LOT less for smaller bikes. When I went in to get quotes today, the broker literally gasped out loud when I said "Kawasaki Ninja". ;D She expected the results to be unbearable and was very surprised by the quote I was given.

Matthew Leverton
Supreme Loser
January 1999
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My helmet. :o

Trent Gamblin
Member #261
April 2000
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No frickin laser beams?

Dario ff
Member #10,065
August 2008
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No pictures of you riding the bike, or wearing the helmet, or using both? :-X

TranslatorHack 2010, a human translation chain in a.cc.
My games: [GiftCraft] - [Blocky Rhythm[SH2011]] - [Elven Revolution] - [Dune Smasher!]

Matthew Leverton
Supreme Loser
January 1999
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I only do one at a time. :-/

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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bamccaig said:

The insurance is also a LOT less for smaller bikes. When I went in to get quotes today, the broker literally gasped out loud when I said "Kawasaki Ninja". ;D She expected the results to be unbearable and was very surprised by the quote I was given.

It's only 600cc and above that have insurance hikes.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
"Political Correctness is fascism disguised as manners" --George Carlin

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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It's only 600cc and above that have insurance hikes.

I haven't found a sport bike yet with an engine's displacement between 250 cc and 600 cc. :-/ Certainly not in Canada/USA.

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
"Political Correctness is fascism disguised as manners" --George Carlin

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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A 500 is practically a 600... ::) Suzuki conveniently offers no suggested price on their Web site (not the Canadian Web site anyway) and the nearest dealer is over an hour drive away. The Kawasaki Ninja 500R is apparently over CAD$7000.

juvinious
Member #5,145
October 2004
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bamccaig said:

The Kawasaki Ninja 500R is apparently over CAD$7000.

And apparently the last of that series in 2009. They are phasing it out and marketing the 600 in it's place.

__________________________________________
Paintown

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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bamccaig said:

A 500 is practically a 600...

Except on the grounds of insurance price and horsepower. ::)

The 500cc Suzuki has 52 hp. The 500cc Ninja has 59 hp. The 600cc Suzuki has 125 hp. Meanwhile, I see new 2009 500 Ninjas on eBay for $3,600.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
"Political Correctness is fascism disguised as manners" --George Carlin

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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eBay?! :o You want me to buy a motorcycle on eBay?! ::) By the time I get it shipped, probably for a few thousand dollars, and likely over the border, through customs, pay duty, etc., it'll probably be September; which I guess will be good because I'll have the whole off season to fix all of the things wrong with the "mint condition!!!!!111" motorcycle. ;D

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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bamccaig said:

By the time I get it shipped,

Why would you ship it? It's a motorcycle. Drive it.

10 minutes of searching got all of the following information:

2005 Kawasaki Ninja 500R; 3,073 miles; $2,000 to $2,700 (Buy It Now).

The Bike

Directions

But if you'd rather pay more than twice that, there's nothing I can say at this point.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
"Political Correctness is fascism disguised as manners" --George Carlin

juvinious
Member #5,145
October 2004
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I personally wouldn't go with the old ex250 models (2007 and below) as the kawi 250r was completely redone from engine to body in 2008... which includes a nice gas gauge. If you want more information between the differences of the two you can view a very good write up here.

In fact, a good deal of resource and information for kawi 250's can be found here, I'd highly recommend reading through that site.

__________________________________________
Paintown

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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Thanks, juvinious. I'll definitely be reading through both of those sites.

** EDIT **

The rest of the gear, I'll make do with what I have for now (regular leather jacket, gloves, and high ankle covering shoes.

Based on what I've been reading, you should expect to spend up to $1000 on proper safety gear for motorcycling. It sounds like a really good idea to have since you really can't prevent other drivers from wrecking you. It seems having "armor" will give you a better chance of avoiding maiming or death. Have you invested in better gear since you posted this or do you ever intend to?

Arthur Kalliokoski
Second in Command
February 2005
avatar

Leather clothes and high top boots are more to prevent abrasion when sliding along the pavement than to provide impact resistance.

The only way Trump is going to be involved in a landslide is if the land surrounding the White House collapses into the Earth's core. -- bamccaig

Vanneto
Member #8,643
May 2007

bamccaig said:

It seems having "armor" will give you a better chance of avoiding maiming or death.

Nothing except the helmet helps for serious injuries. Basically, if you hit something or something hits you at a high speed, you're dead. Period. Oh the adrenaline. ;D

In capitalist America bank robs you.

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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If you survive it will probably be after sliding across the pavement for a few hundred feet. :P A jacket doesn't help you much if you aren't wearing the pants to match it. Plus, most leather jackets are probably designed with form before function whereas when it comes to motorcycle gear you'd probably prefer it was designed for its intended purpose.

In the motorcycle gear that I'm looking at, there is impact padding in all the major joints, etc. There is also a back protector (extra) that fits inside the suit. It might not prevent injury, but it should protect you from a lot more than just a plain leather jacket would.

VizViz.jpg

http://www.aerostich.com/aerostich-suits/roadcrafter-one-piece-suit.html

If you get it in high visibility coloring like I'm planning to then you'll also be easier to see than with black leather (albeit, a yellow, one-piece suit would probably look kind of silly on a cruiser).

:-/

Matthew Leverton
Supreme Loser
January 1999
avatar

If you crash a motorcycle and hit something immediately upon flying off the bike, you're going to be in bad shape no matter what. Otherwise, if you hit the ground cleanly (especially when low-siding), the proper gear will save you a lot of skin. You may still have plenty of broken bones.

But obviously it's more risky riding a bike and crashes are usually not going to end well. However, I've read stories about bikers walking away from accidents without a scratch, while the person who caused the accident was dead on impact. So there's no sure thing.

And no, I don't have proper gear yet. I have leather jacket and gloves, but they aren't reinforced with any sort of armor. I'll be upgrading my leg and feet defense within the next month.

I'll be geared up properly by the time summer comes and I'm doing 180 MPH on the bike. :o

bamccaig said:

If you get it in high visibility coloring

I'm pretty sure that's a biohazard suit. :o



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