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Pennsylvania sucks
Johan Halmén
Member #1,550
September 2001

...at naming places. I'm working on a datasheet with 40,000 cities around the World (all over the World for you Flat Earthers). Cities with same names must be distinguished by country and region (state). I find almost no doubles in other states in USA, but Pennsylvania has a lot of them. Here's the list:

#SelectExpand
1Adams 40.7092 -80.012 2Bethel 39.8458 -75.4891 3Butler 40.8616 -79.8962 4Carroll 40.1142 -77.0191 5Carroll 40.1813 -79.9313 6Center 40.6483 -80.2977 7Conewago 40.0657 -76.7932 8Derry 40.2709 -76.6561 9Exeter 40.3139 -75.834 10Fairview 40.1735 -76.8655 11Franklin 41.3936 -79.8425 12Hamilton 39.9432 -77.7327 13Hanover 39.8117 -76.9835 14Hanover 40.6669 -75.3979 15Hopewell 40.5906 -80.2731 16Jackson 40.3774 -76.3142 17Jackson 39.9057 -76.8796 18Middletown 40.179 -74.9059 19Middletown 39.9094 -75.4312 20Middletown 40.201 -76.7289 21Montgomery 40.2411 -75.2319 22Montgomery 39.7717 -77.8979 23Northampton 40.2104 -75.0014 24Penn 39.7994 -76.9642 25Penn 40.1864 -76.3726 26Plymouth 40.1115 -75.2977 27Richland 40.4491 -75.3362 28Richland 40.2841 -78.845 29Ross 40.5256 -80.0243 30Salisbury 40.5768 -75.4535 31Scott 40.3875 -80.0791 32Southampton 40.0249 -77.546 33Spring 40.3037 -76.0263 34Springfield 39.928 -75.3362 35Springfield 40.0986 -75.2016 36Springfield 39.8466 -76.7112 37Warwick 40.1558 -76.2799 38Washington 39.7494 -77.558 39Washington 40.174 -80.2466 40Washington 40.5093 -79.6011 41Washington 40.7389 -75.6392

New Jersey seems to have three Franklin and four Washington. The numbers are coordinates. Some of them point to more or less the same place.

I'm working on an old Earth globe, which will get a stepper motor, a servo motor and a laser beam to point out places.

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Years of thorough research have revealed that the red "x" that closes a window, really isn't red, but white on red background.

Years of thorough research have revealed that what people find beautiful about the Mandelbrot set is not the set itself, but all the rest.

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

Hmm. I guess you could drill down by country, county, then city. But yeah, I never really thought about duplicates... in the same state. Originality is dangerous!

[edit] Apparently many more were same named, but the Postal Service refused to allow duplicate names and I guess they changed:

https://www.quora.com/Are-there-any-cases-of-two-US-cities-with-the-same-name-in-a-single-state

There are FIVE Miami Townships in Ohio. O_O

Here's a few in other countries but you ain't kidding that it at least "seems" like the USA has the most:

https://www.quora.com/Is-the-USA-the-only-country-that-has-multiple-cities-with-the-same-names

It could be related to how the US was settled. People quickly moving west into an "almost" empty country (::cough::natives::cough::), maybe keeping the same "town" names to mean their people. Compared with centuries old cities throughout Europe and a much much higher population density.

I mean, Russia has plenty of room, for example. But nobody is spending 100+ years rushing to get to that empty area and build towns.

It might have to do with the specific culture and political situation of the world at the time too. Maybe "same names" was more acceptable or normal during the specific time of progression across the USA.

I mean heck, half the USA cities are named after a British one. (I can't imagine why!) We've got Bristol's all over the place, even Canada! (Also Richmond is popular whereever the UK dumped citizens off including South Africa and Australia):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_places_called_Bristol

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
"Political Correctness is fascism disguised as manners" --George Carlin

Johan Halmén
Member #1,550
September 2001

I have only Miamisburg, Ohio. No Miami in Ohio. First I thought Pennsylvania has listed every and each little borough, while other states have listed only bigger towns. But my listing seems to have all cities with 5000 or more inhabitants.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Years of thorough research have revealed that the red "x" that closes a window, really isn't red, but white on red background.

Years of thorough research have revealed that what people find beautiful about the Mandelbrot set is not the set itself, but all the rest.

Mark Oates
Member #1,146
March 2001
avatar

I'm working on an old Earth globe, which will get a stepper motor, a servo motor and a laser beam to point out places.

That sounds like a neat project. I've always wanted to mess with robots through steppers and motors. What are you using as your platform? Where did you source your motors?

Elias
Member #358
May 2000

In Ohio any municipality with less than 5000 people (not counting prisoners) loses the right to call itself "city" and is renamed a "village". With people leaving the countryside that's happening to quite a few cities here :P

Besides cities and villages Ohio is also divided geographically into 88 counties and each county is divided into about 20 townships. Those townships have unique names within their county but are re-used for separate counties, so yeah, there may very well be 5 Miami townships. Their only relevance is that if your house is not within any village or city then your address becomes the township - but people living in a village or city probably don't even know the township name as it is meaningless.

[edit:] @Johan: I feel your data source for Pennsylvania is mixing cities and townships and most of those duplicates are not cities at all. This list for example has no duplicates: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_cities_in_Pennsylvania

[edit 2:] This list is like yours though: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_municipalities_in_Pennsylvania And the meaning of "township" and "city" differs a lot between Ohio and Pennsylvania. So yeah...

--
"Either help out or stop whining" - Evert

LennyLen
Member #5,313
December 2004
avatar

Elias said:

In Ohio any municipality with less than 5000 people (not counting prisoners) loses the right to call itself "city" and is renamed a "village".

That sounds fair enough. Our town has about 8,000 people and it's way too small to be called a city.

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

LennyLen said:

Our town has about 8,000 people and it's way too small to be called a city.

Holy crap, you could fit your entire town into a single building (of many) of my city's medical system. Vanderbilt employs somewhere around 24,000 people (that might include their other hospitals in their system), let alone the amount of patients. The hospital alone has over 1,000 beds!

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs
"Political Correctness is fascism disguised as manners" --George Carlin

Johan Halmén
Member #1,550
September 2001

That sounds like a neat project. I've always wanted to mess with robots through steppers and motors. What are you using as your platform? Where did you source your motors?

I might use an Arduino MKR 1000 as the central microprocessor. It can use wifi, so it will poll a certain web address to check if anyone has requested it to point to any coordinate.

I have an old stepper motor I picked from a matrix printer. It had a perfect cog wheel for a cog belt. I 3D printed another cog wheel, which I attached to the globe around the south pole.

I have a hobby servo, which can turn 270 degrees. It will turn a 3D printed thing with the laser pointer and a few super bright white leds.

Here's what my page says aout Bristol:

<img src="https://d1cxvcw9gjxu2x.cloudfront.net/attachments/613070">

Here's a page with which I test my database:

https://johanhalmen.link/epsimu/

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Years of thorough research have revealed that the red "x" that closes a window, really isn't red, but white on red background.

Years of thorough research have revealed that what people find beautiful about the Mandelbrot set is not the set itself, but all the rest.

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