Allegro.cc - Online Community

Allegro.cc Forums » Off-Topic Ordeals » Buying a domain..

This thread is locked; no one can reply to it. rss feed Print
 1   2 
Buying a domain..
type568
Member #8,381
March 2007
avatar

I need a little website, and go figure to what will it grow. So I picked a suitable domain, I wanna buy it.. Initially it's some 7$, then it turns to 30 a year. I plan to buy it form namecheap.com (any alternative suggestions?).

7$ is fine, 30 is - well, I don't mind. Although what is there to be worth even that? Oh well.

But there is an issue: some domains are cheap, others expensive. The domain I'm buying is nearly worthless, as long as there is no website attached to it. Afterwards, the domain's personal worth for me will increase dramatically.

So the question is, how am I protected against a rate hike should the seller decide he wants to earn more from me?

If my efforts increase the value of a domain, it's certainly still has to belong to me.

Something tells me a lot of people here have a lot of experience with this topic.. I hope you can help me out :D

Thanks.

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
avatar

I've been using name.com for a few years. I have no major complaints yet. I don't think a good registrar would suddenly boost the price of your renewal after a year or after the site became popular, but then I've never had a site get popular. ;)

type568
Member #8,381
March 2007
avatar

I think there's some law regulating this.. I'd like to know.

Mark Oates
Member #1,146
March 2001
avatar

Namecheap is my favorite so far.

I used to keep domains on the host but that has turned into a bit of an unnecessary annoyance when you have a lot of domains and need to change hosting.

The seller can’t boost the price of the domain once it’s registered to you. You own it when it’s registered in your name, it’s like a home. If a domain is high right now what’s because somebody else already owns it but wants to get rid of it and sees it as having some value.

MiquelFire
Member #3,110
January 2003
avatar

I had switched most of my domains to Hover.

---
Febreze (and other air fresheners actually) is just below perfumes/colognes, and that's just below dead skunks in terms of smells that offend my nose.
MiquelFire.red | +Me
Windows 8 is a toned, stylish, polished professional athlete. But it’s wearing clown makeup, and that creates a serious image problem. ~PCWorld Article

m c
Member #5,337
December 2004
avatar

i've used a few (godaddy, network solutions, namecheap, name.com) always want free privacy and cheaper renewal, for last 2 years i've been using namesilo they very slightly cheaper than the other last time i checked which was 2 years ago

affiliate link price page https://www.namesilo.com/pricing.php?rid=cfbb673cp

affiliate coupon $1 off DFCMS

(\ /)_____#_____####__#
(O.o)¯¯¯#¯¯¯¯¯#¯¯¯#¯¯#
(> <)__####__####__####
Megabytes are where I keep my Data.

Edgar Reynaldo
Member #8,592
May 2007
avatar

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

I've got two (bought three total) through GoDaddy.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Edgar Reynaldo
Member #8,592
May 2007
avatar

MiquelFire
Member #3,110
January 2003
avatar

Domain prices tend to go UP! Some part of it is because of ICANN (A web host I use complains about it a lot. Sometimes they'll send a notice I think through their blog about incoming price increases be ICANN wants to charge a higher fee) And other times it's just whoever owns the TLD.

Best bet, buy up to 10 years now, or as soon as you can, and you won't need to worry about the price jump until 10 years from whenever you last renewed.

10 Years is the most amount of time you can have on a domain. Trying to buy more is just wasting money. So if you have 9.5 years, renewing will charge you the year price, but you'll only add half a year.

---
Febreze (and other air fresheners actually) is just below perfumes/colognes, and that's just below dead skunks in terms of smells that offend my nose.
MiquelFire.red | +Me
Windows 8 is a toned, stylish, polished professional athlete. But it’s wearing clown makeup, and that creates a serious image problem. ~PCWorld Article

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
avatar

I haven't used GoDaddy in years, but when I did their site was a brainfuck to navigate, and I wasn't impressed by their service either. I don't think their price was anything to make up for it either. Another one I can recommend against is 1&1. They royally fucked me by "linking" my domains to my host so when I tried to change hosts they wanted to charge me again for domains I already owned. I recommend you avoid moving domains to a host. Keep them separate so that they can't do that to you. Also, a registrar first is going to do the registrar thing better, whereas a host first is going to half ass the registrar thing.

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

Yeah, we discussed that before. It's not as bad anymore.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Mark Oates
Member #1,146
March 2001
avatar

Don’t use GoDaddy. That’s my only other piece of advice 😄

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

Why? Better not be some political reason. :P

I mean, it's a freakin' domain forwarding service. You want a taco, you go to a taco stand. As long as the taco tastes good, what more do you want?

And I'm NOT defending GoDaddy like I "like them" or anything. They're just a tool. What I'm curious is... what are people's actual reasons for hating them? (like I said, the GUI is fine now.)

I buy a domain, they bill me. I cancel a domain, they stop billing me. I don't get spam. And their DNS entries change "fairly" quickly (within hours). It's no speed-record, but it's a reasonable time for DNS to propagate.

I have way more to complain about with my ISP, than my DNS.

I've considered cheaper ones. But GoDaddy isn't that expensive ($20/year), and I supposedly, I get "name brand" / USA company / etc customer service should something really go wrong. Whereas, with lots of these tiny companies, you may not get a service return for awhile because they don't have 24/7 service (because they're a 1/2/3 man operation), or they might just say "Go !@$! yourself" and with a larger company--it seems like--there's more room for customer service. Like, if I had a horrific experience, I could tell the news, and it'd be a PR blunder / threat and they'd fix it immediately. Like when that guy saved up for SEVEN YEARS to buy a Porsche (his childhood dream) and it was was a complete lemon and had to take it to shop like 20+ times and the shops kept telling him it's his fault or not covered and he made a video on YouTube about his experiences and everyone was like "OMG that's the saddest thing ever." and Porsche decided to give him a brand new one or refund it.

https://jalopnik.com/the-saga-of-the-lemon-911-and-one-mans-quest-for-just-1564141012

https://jalopnik.com/victory-porsche-says-theyll-buy-lemon-911-guys-car-b-1564711471

Buying from those little places is like buying something "custom" from eBay, verses a brand. Oh, how I've been burned by eBay many times. "Fully rebuilt engine"--rattles because there's a tool inside the engine and in the oil pan. Drove 20 hours to get it. "Fully rebuilt, upgraded VW transmission, $1600"--works, but in 5th gear, the shifter moves with the torque of the engine implying something is wrong. If those were real companies, I could have threatened them with a small claims court.

That said, again, I'm not opposed to trustable competitors. If they actually compete on ... price... or service. I've heard Namecheap before.

[edit]

Hmm... namecheap is like half the price of Godaddy. I mean, $20 vs $10 a year isn't really... anything. But still. Why waste money.

But their "domain finder" javascript thing keeps timing out while GoDaddy actually loads.

bamccaig said:

Another one I can recommend against is 1&1. They royally ed me by "linking" my domains to my host so when I tried to change hosts they wanted to charge me again for domains I already owned. I recommend you avoid moving domains to a host.

WTF.

[edit]

Okay, now I'm on a Namecheap binge. No idea how bad/easy the service will be. But some of their "Deals" are like, $1.00 domain names and it "seems" like you DON'T have to buy another year in advance at retail price. Whereas GoDaddy requires you to pay $20 (normal year) plus the sale price. But I haven't gotten to the checkout yet.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

MiquelFire
Member #3,110
January 2003
avatar

Wait, GoDaddy forces you to buy two years? You can't just buy one year?

---
Febreze (and other air fresheners actually) is just below perfumes/colognes, and that's just below dead skunks in terms of smells that offend my nose.
MiquelFire.red | +Me
Windows 8 is a toned, stylish, polished professional athlete. But it’s wearing clown makeup, and that creates a serious image problem. ~PCWorld Article

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

If you buy one on sale, if you want the sale price, you also pay for the next year.

$3.00 sale
$20 normal

$23 for two years.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
avatar

Basically $3 bonus profit plus the normal profit... GoDaddy is a racket. You answered your own question. :P

Honestly, I'm pretty sure I got shit service from GoDaddy. It has been too long (read: many beers) to remember details. I know I got shit service from 1&1.

I think I've gotten great service from name.com. You have to be careful when choosing the "little" guys, but by word of mouth from trusted peers you can find the good ones (I posted here many years ago and ML recommended name.com at the time).

Whereas the big guys won't treat you well because you're literally nothing to them. They don't care about you. They care about the 4 or 5 figure clients. The 2 figure clients are just easy money for the big guys. If they neglect them anyway.

Think about it.. GoDaddy is a primary sponsor for a fucking Nascar team. :P That's insanely expensive. They're a goddamn registrar and Web host. Not sure what else, but I don't think they do anything particularly well. How do they afford to run the racing team and still make a profit? I haven't seen their numbers, but I'd say they're fucking the average client hard and most of them never know it.

Mark Oates
Member #1,146
March 2001
avatar

Why? Better not be some political reason. :P

I think bam said it best:

bamccaig said:

GoDaddy is a racket

Bam's on point with this one. GoDaddy is one big upsell, like buying travel tickets through some upsell agency. And once you become a customer they don't treat you any differently. Their interface is shit. Also the stuff he's said here I've had similar experiences with. Just skimming the web, there are some more points outlined here: https://karveldigital.com/why-i-dont-use-godaddy-you-shouldnt-either/

1&1, Bluehost, and FatCow are what I've hosted www.allmusiclibrary.com and a bunch of others on as a freelance web designer... but that was a long time ago. They're oooookkaaaaay I guess. 1&1 is not the best when it comes to keeping the customer in mind. When compared to 1&1, GoDaddy is a shitshow.

My favorite so far is probably FatCow. I would recommend them above all the others for what you're trying to do.

Either way, now-a-days I do my hosting on more elaborate platforms like Heroku or Google Cloud, so I haven't used those platforms much in the past 6 years apart from moving my stuff off of them :P

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

One of my IT friends also just recommended NameCheap.

Google Cloud

When my personal site was up, I literally hosted it on Google Docs. I had a simple webserver and embedded a Google Doc for every page. So I could easily through Google (any PC) WYSIWYG edit my pages.

It forced everything to look like a Word doc, but it still had a kind of professionalism / this-is-my-resume look.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

type568
Member #8,381
March 2007
avatar

One of my IT friends also just recommended NameCheap.

Same, so namecheap it is.
But main question generally remains unanswered, with two conflicting claims(& no sources of course): can the price go up? And can it be "unfair"?

About GoDaddy.. Well, I believe it's is MOST KNOWN domain seller, by far. Like where to buy a domain? GoDaddy! I knew bout it when I was a kid.. Now must be the kids grew up, and not all of'em bother to post on A.CC where should they host, nor all of'em have IT friends, I guess..

So that's how GoDaddy affords Nascar team :P

P.S:
Yep, the difference seems to be like 2:1 for the domain I want, and due to the fact so many people here named namecheap, it isn't a small group either. So it's likely not to screw up things.

However, should I be worrying about privacy anyhow?

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
avatar

When you register a domain you are required by law to provide your name and address and contact info. By default, anybody can look this up in a registry and find this information. If you don't want it to be publicly available, you can get private WHOIS services for the domain. Basically, your registrar will give out their own information instead, and more hoops are required to access the real information. I'm not sure if the public can still access it, or if they need a legitimate reason (e.g., law enforcement). Some registrars will give you this for free, while some might charge another fee to get it (e.g., $5 or $10 per year). Just like the domain, you'll have to renew the WHOIS privacy whenever it expires (usually a year or two, depending on how long you register for). In short, there's no real "privacy" when registering a domain. You are expected to give your true identity so that will be linked to the domain one way or another.

type568
Member #8,381
March 2007
avatar

I wonder what are my risks if I provide the info without privacy. Furthermore, who's gonna verify my address should I desire to arrange my own privacy free of charge?

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
avatar

https://webmasters.stackexchange.com/questions/10473/providing-fake-info-during-domain-registration-does-it-matter

Maybe the only risk is that you could lose the domain if you happen to get checked.. If you're willing to risk it then that doesn't seem so serious. But then again if you're attached to your domains you'd probably hate to lose them.

Samuel Henderson
Member #3,757
August 2003
avatar

type568 said:

I wonder what are my risks if I provide the info without privacy. Furthermore, who's gonna verify my address should I desire to arrange my own privacy free of charge?

All of my contact information for my domains is pointing to an apartment I haven't lived in for 12 years or so :P

I should probably update that ... ahhh ... I'll do it tomorrow :D

=================================================
Paul whoknows: Why is this thread still open?
Onewing: Because it is a pthread: a thread for me to pee on.

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
avatar

I think it's really !@$!@'d up that you have to have a name and address, in the modern world on a WHOIS. (It's annoying enough every time I register a website that I get super-spammed on my phone number with cold calls for "web design".)

That means literally anyone could find your WHOIS, and send you a mail bomb or stalk you, for hosting content that a political faction hates. ANTIFA hates that you're not 100% for transgender people fighting in MMA matches? Firebomb. Neo-Conservatives find out you like abortions? Firebomb. You're a black person? Burning cross in your yard--or worse, someone steals your kids on their way to school. You're a beautiful woman? They literally have your address.

And if you ever owned a domain BEFORE adding a privacy guard, there's like a 99% chance someone already has that WHOIS snapshotted in a database that users can buy access to.

I'm okay with people disagreeing with me. But we really do live in a world of not increased crazies, but increased utilization of crazy people. Twitter "leaders" who will "hint" for someone to be attacked and then someone crazy person attacks. The leader disavows, the crazy person is completely anonymous until they attack (and possibly after). And almost nobody has any direct consequences for spreading hate to every day people. Hating politicians is one thing, but everyday american's being hunted and fired from their jobs, that's scary. It has a chilling effect (should I even post this? Is it worth being possibly stalked?), and honestly, we as a society should demand a better world than this by actually adapting laws and systems to accommodate for this new kind of attacker. WHOIS shouldn't have open access to addresses. And other laws, regulations, and services should also be adapted to help stop it. Twitter should have already faced congressional scrutiny by now.

[edit]

You can't have Privacy WHOIS with .US domains? WTF?!.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

 1   2 


Go to: