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How does a pirate pass arguments to a function?
Mark Oates
Member #1,146
March 2001
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How does a pirate pass in parameters to a function?

Through arrrrrgs

(this is my first post typed in DVORAK 8-))

edit: ;D joke ruined because thread title wrong, and thinking slow because new keyboard hard. facepalm.

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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1) Ahahahahha

2) Dvorak? Hahhahahahaha

Two jokes in one!

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Mark Oates
Member #1,146
March 2001
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It's fun, you should try it! It reminds me of the bicycle experiment with the mirror goggles:

Quote:

eventually, somehow, adjusts to interpret it — to perceive it, to see it — as being no different from normal. Kohler writes that, "after several weeks of wearing goggles that transposed right and left, one person "became so at home in his reversed world that he was able to drive a motorcycle through Innsbruck while wearing the goggles".

type568
Member #8,381
March 2007
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Joke's funny. What's a dvorak?

Chris Katko
Member #1,881
January 2002
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A horrible idea. :)

You swap the letters around on your keyboard because they're "more efficient" than QWERTY. The problem is, every software package you use is designed to use QWERTY so you end up having to remap everything, or re-learn every single package. And when you end up having to use a QWERTY keyboard on someone else's machines, you're slow again.

And after all that work, you realize 99% of your programming isn't slower because of your writing speed but because of your thought speed.

-----sig:
“Programs should be written for people to read, and only incidentally for machines to execute.” - Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

type568
Member #8,381
March 2007
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Guess I know what's Dvorak then. & yeah, such a compatibility loss isn't worth extra 10 symbols a minute. Make it 100 - doesn't matter.

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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I think it's a neat idea, but they should start teaching kids DVORAK in schools where their minds are fresh and they have all the time in the world to learn. As those kids advance to the high school and college level bring in DVORAK keyboards for them, and as they advance into the workforce make DVORAK keyboards available for them. If they're actually more efficient then it makes good sense for the world to use them. It will be a little bit painful to re-learn for those of us that have already memorized QWERTY, but it probably won't actually be very difficult in the long run. We memorize complex things all the time when we encounter them regularly and don't even have to try. The fact that programs exist to ease the process only makes things easier.

Mark, I'll be very interested to hear about your progress in a few months! I wonder if you end up confusing layouts or are able to switch between them easily enough once you have learned DVORAK too.

LennyLen
Member #5,313
December 2004
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bamccaig said:

but they should start teaching kids DVORAK in schools where their minds are fresh and they have all the time in the world to learn.

By the time society is ready to take advantage of such a change, we may not even be using keyboards anymore.

bamccaig
Member #7,536
July 2006
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LennyLen said:

By the time society is ready to take advantage of such a change, we may not even be using keyboards anymore.

I cannot imagine keyboards going anywhere for a long time. I have yet to encounter a more efficient interface between man and machine. Children could be using DVORAK in a few weeks time, and the cost of a new keyboard is negligible to any business that actually benefits from it. I really don't see any reason why we shouldn't transition society from the schools up if DVORAK is truly "better" overall. That said, if it's better for some specialized tasks, and not for others, then perhaps it is better left in obscurity. Particularly if it's bad for e.g., software development since I think it's better to optimize the human-machine interface for that. But that's rather hastily spoken with little thought.

Neil Roy
Member #2,229
April 2002
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I found a good article on the two keyboards.

http://thekindle3books.com/qwerty-vs-dvorak-the-two-great-keyboards-the-time-were-born/

Personally, I'll stick with QWERTY, I can type plenty fast as it is.

What is interesting is that QWERTY keyboards were invented to slow down typing, due to jams in mechanical typewriters. These days, they seem just as fast on computers.

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