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Fritzl Facebook
Tobias Dammers
Member #2,604
August 2002
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Evert said:

The phrase is at least loaded with the suggestion that people turn away and don't like to think about unpleasant things and avoid them instead.

EDIT: it's possible it carries this negative connotation mainly in the Netherlands, but I think I remember it carries the same association in Germany and one wouldn't normally use the phrase in this way because of that context. Someone correct me if I'm wrong.

It's mainly a Dutch thing. In Germany, people use the sentence without any implied second meaning (except when quoted in a relevant discussion).
Also, Germans never "get" Dutch bicycle jokes (when they invaded the Netherlands, German troops confiscated every single bicycle they could find, claiming they were needed for the war, and they were never returned; somehow, between all the other crimes and horrors, this one stuck in the collective Dutch mind).
Oh, and it's "gewußt", not "gewüßt". And while we're at it, "Apfelstrüdel" is wrong, the correct spelling is "Apfelstrudel".

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Christopher Bludau
Member #5,401
January 2005

In Germany, people use the sentence without any implied second meaning

I'm from germany and I always think about the people after war when hearing that sentence. So it carries this connotation here too. At least for me. I think my freinds in the same age will think so too.

Another sentence with a bad taste is: "Jedem das seine" (suum cuique / To each his own) It was written on the gates to some concentration camps (implying that everyone gets what he diserves including the jews in the camps).

Because of this it is barely used in germany and everytime you say it you get angry looks.

Matthew Leverton
Supreme Loser
January 1999
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Tobias, why do you single space your paragraphs?

To be on topic, my stalker Facebook photo:

{"name":"598124","src":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/e\/7\/e717cf5f0f38a7487945ddc3c0f0613f.png","w":737,"h":248,"tn":"\/\/djungxnpq2nug.cloudfront.net\/image\/cache\/e\/7\/e717cf5f0f38a7487945ddc3c0f0613f"}598124

Evert
Member #794
November 2000
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It's mainly a Dutch thing. In Germany, people use the sentence without any implied second meaning (except when quoted in a relevant discussion).

Ok. I had heard it being sensitive to some people/in certain contexts. But I guess it is a common enough sentence that it'd be very awkward if it had any attached meaning.

Quote:

Also, Germans never "get" Dutch bicycle jokes (when they invaded the Netherlands, German troops confiscated every single bicycle they could find, claiming they were needed for the war, and they were never returned; somehow, between all the other crimes and horrors, this one stuck in the collective Dutch mind).


We're Dutch, don't mess with our bikes!
I've never seen that one as anything other than a joke. In the Dutch-list of bad things the Germans do/did to us: 1. They beat us at the football world-championship (1974? I'm not a football fan), 2. They dig holes in our beaches, 3. They stole our bikes

Quote:

Oh, and it's "gewußt", not "gewüßt".


I always said my German was too embarrassing for general use. That's what you get for trying to use Google to look these things up; if I'd just gone with the pronunciation I know, I'd have spelled it correctly.

Quote:

And while we're at it, "Apfelstrüdel" is wrong, the correct spelling is "Apfelstrudel".

Same thing: if you go by the sound, it's obvious.

Darizel
Member #10,585
January 2009
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I never got the difference between ü and u.

Kind of hoping someone will tell me .

I don't know any languages other than English.

Of course, I also have no idea what û is either.

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BAF
Member #2,981
December 2002
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Haha, brilliant Matthew.

LennyLen
Member #5,313
December 2004
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Darizel said:

I never got the difference between ü and u.

The ¨ can be used for two purposes - to either show that the sound of the vowel is changed from the norm, or to indicate that the vowel sound should be stressed individually from an adjacent vowel (such as with the English word naïve (contrast this to the sound of ai in brain)).

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