I hate open source.
Chris Katko

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I just spent a full day, maybe longer, working on this video project using Kdenlive. It's like an open source Adobe Premiere for non-linear video editing. Tons of hard work into my project.

Then I go to render and find out that everywhere I used a speed-up/slow-down effect on clips... it basically destroys after you save. It took me at least an hour to realize it was only affecting those clips, and another hour or two of googling and trying fixes to workout the issue. The clips get moved to a random position on the source material and if you modify them the "effects" are all missing and the file will be corrupted.

I tried newer versions... and they also corrupt the project.

I made an account and posted my problem.

... no replies.

>:(

My current solution (which has sucked all the fun out of the project) that I'm left with, is convert each of my hour long clips MANUALLY into 2x, 1/2x, 1/4x, etc complete files, add them to my project, and find the EXACT spot where the boundaries should be (before I could just "clip"/"snip" an existing clip at the front and back, and then apply the motion filter for that section. No syncing needed.). And, there goes any interactivity and tweaking because I'll have to know the exact speeds in advance. So I can't tweak the speed 10% up or down and have it match the duration I'm looking for.

p.s. (Don't get me wrong, closed-source tools have incredible failures. Like Adobe After Effects? CANNOT LOAD MKV files. What's an MKV? Just a CONTAINER for an MP4. (Simplification.) It's !@$!@'ing pathetic that you can't, in 2018/2019/3048, load a well-known format or even support a public extension system like... WINAMP did... in the 90's.) But something as fundamental as a speed plugin would have not passed a QA stage and if it did, the customers would have raised a storm and it would have been resolved.

p.p.s Also, upping the project resolution from 1080p to 1440p because I forgot to at the start? BREAKS ALL CLIPS. They all end up zero length so I'd have to manually re-sync over a hundred clips.

torhu

It's Friday, you're supposed to drink.

Edgar Reynaldo

Good thing Sunday means the start of another week. ;)

You mean you hate open source because of all the bugs? And that the software doesn't do what you want it to? I thought you owned FLStudio, does that do video? Or just audio?

torhu

Imagine driving an open source car. Or sitting in an open source plane. The difference between you wanting to do that or not would not be if they are open source or not.

Chris Katko

You mean you hate open source because of all the bugs?

Actually, I've had plenty of bad bugs that aren't fixed because devs don't care about the particular platform or area. VLC doesn't give two !@#$!@'s about Windows bugs.

But like I said, I'm just frustrated at such a stupid, essential bug not being fixed.

NiteHackr

A video editor I heard some good things about is called OpenShot. I am not experienced in this, but I may give it a try. Blender can also do video editing, though I am not certain how well as I am fairly new to this. But those are what I am looking at.

bamccaig

Proprietary software regularly has bugs, and generally speaking the vendors do not care to fix them unless important clients or a very large number of people are affected.

For example, Microsoft Outlook often inserts extra lines between text, but only when viewing the message. While composing the message it looks normal. Then after you've sent it everybody using certain versions of Outlook gets extra lines (like say 3 lines for every line in the message). Needless to say, this looks very sloppy and unprofessional. And the interesting thing is that other mail clients display the message fine. It seems only Outlook (and the online version, Outlook 365) suffer from this. And if you search the Web for this you'll discover that it has plagued the desktop client for years, and I have personally experienced it in the Web client for about 2 or 3 years as well. You'd think it would be simple to fix, but apparently Microsoft doesn't care about users of its software being able to send professionally formatted correspondence for business purposes. ::) I think that if you carefully shift+enter the newlines in the message you can sort of control it, but needless to say it's tedious to fix them, and all it takes is adding one new line without realizing it and it all goes to shit.

So yeah, if you think only open source software has bugs, or that only open source bugs don't get fixed, you're dreaming. And of course you're overlooking something huge about open source that proprietary software cannot compete with: the source code for the open source tool is available. If you are motivated enough you could develop a fix yourself. Or, you could hire a developer with the needed skills to fix it. You could potentially use one of those community funded Web sites to accumulate the funds needed to hire a developer with the necessary skills too. There are plenty of options. Whereas the price to tell Microsoft or Apple or Adobe what to do with their products is probably far more than a developer's time.

(I tried to reply to this thread a few days ago when I was stoned, but I couldn't focus long enough and started going off on tangents that didn't make sense ;D)

Append:

And I second OpenShot. It's the best video editing software that I have used. And I even paid for a Sony product while I was experimenting with motovlogging a couple of years back. But OpenShot worked better than that proprietary for-profit software (I think I paid something like $120 for the license). Certainly there are probably much better tools with more advanced features if you have a professional budget, but if you're looking for something cheap or free (and legal) OpenShot is a good contender.

Edgar Reynaldo

Open source projects are regularly abandoned, often in half finished states.

But since it's open, you can attempt to build and fix it yourself, which is often a horrible pain, and takes way longer than necessary.

bamccaig

Proprietary projects also fail regularly. ::) You're not making a valid argument. You're effectively complaining that people aren't doing good enough work for for you for free.

relpatseht

The problem isn't open source in this case. All artist tools are terrible and riddled with bugs. It's a cultural problem where artists blame themselves when a program crashes and/or find workaround and move on. That's been my general experience, anyway.

Edgar Reynaldo

bambams - the point of making a tool is to do a job - if the tool doesn't do its job, it's not really a tool, is it?

NiteHackr

The good thing about open source if when there is such a problem, someone can eventually fix it, even you can with the proper skills.

But there's plenty of open source out there to choose from. If you really need better quality editors, than it's time to fork over some cash for a paid one rather than open source. Up to you. You get what you pay for. Open source can be really good, but it takes time to get to all the problems because, well... the pay sucks! ;)

In my own free game, I get a LOT of feature requests, but the people never want to donate. And I have zero incentive to work on it (which is why I released the source code). They all want features, but nobody wants to donate. One guy did donate and made requests and I implemented every request he wanted, because I had incentive. But working on free software is a real task, and not one with many, if any rewards.

Chris Katko

BUG: https://trac.videolan.org/vlc/ticket/5901?cversion=0&cnum_hist=6

Seven. Years.

VLC from version 2 and 3 has had the same, terrible, annoying, application-breaking bug.

... for at least SEVEN YEARS.

Open any file, device, network IP. Anything. And it fails? If the loop button is on, it will continually load the same failed file/connection/etc over and over (forever) while the ERROR BOX is set to a MODAL BOX so it takes complete focus from the main window (meaning you can't actually click the main window to close it).

The only way to fix it is to keep clicking the X button until Windows (being written by people who aren't retards) detects VLC is no longer handling the message pump (something that should NEVER happen in a program written by humans--as opposed to moneys) and greys the window out, allowing you to intentionally crash the program.

I even told you the solution. All they'd have to do is spawn the error box WITHOUT a tick set "modal" which prevents you from touching the parent window while it's open.

video

I love open source. I love free software. But let's all stop kidding around here and pretend that just because it's open source it will be fixed--no matter HOW simple the solution.

Something that could take less than an hour (max) to fix on a developers machine verses me, installing the complete dev kit (git, Windows/Linux, all the required packages), finding the source code lines for software that's completely foreign to me, and fixing it, AND hoping the devs actually give enough crap to merge it. Oh wait, because my contributions ALSO have to match their coding style so it'll likely need at least one or two "fixes" on my end to be merged in and they'll also have to spend time reviewing my code.

That's a pretty high burden of entry for the simplest possible problem.

And don't be like "omg, just fork it." Yeah, I definitely should fix a bug and have literally no one else know about it so they'll never benefit from it.

So while I'm just kidding about hating open source, let's not pretend that being open source means it's going to be a good product or maintained by courteous people.

Related story: For example, Dolphin is a great project, but I was trying to improve it (and my results were great!) but the people who KNEW facts I needed to know? (even how an API worked) One guy. Who was never on. And required me to get on IRC (no e-mail or forums) and was in Germany so he required me to be on in Germany hours... and only available a couple times a week. It was like pulling my hair out.

And NO, as all my posts apparently have to be 90% disclaimers these days, I'm not saying professional software == well-maintained and open-source software == bad. I'm just b!tching about an open source software package that is wasting my time.

One thing I really hate is when people make really nice websites for products that aren't as polished (OSS or professional). VLC? Kdenlive? Professional looking websites. Websites that would make you THINK you're going to have "Everything inside working". And then you get Kdenlive breaking on something as simple as changing PLAYBACK SPEED of a clip.

torhu

VLC is still improving, slowly but surely. Maybe the issue is that it's almost exclusively used for video, not audio? Even Windows Media Player is better for audio. I also use MediaMonkey for that.

bamccaig

bambams - the point of making a tool is to do a job - if the tool doesn't do its job, it's not really a tool, is it?

The point of attempting to make a tool is attempting to make doing a job easier. Of course, we're not gods, we're humans. Just because we set out to do something doesn't mean that it comes to fruition. It takes a lot of determination/motivation to complete a non-trivial project, let alone do it well. And even if we have that in ample supply there's no guarantee something we do will be good. We might suck at that thing. A lot of "success stories" rely heavily on entropy/luck. Too many things in life lead to that moment, and it cannot easily be replicated. It pretty much "happens when it happens", and the lucky people that benefit had some say in it, but odds are they were also just lucky as hell.

I love open source. I love free software. But let's all stop kidding around here and pretend that just because it's open source it will be fixed--no matter HOW simple the solution.

If it was THAT simple you'd just fix it yourself. :) Often times things that seem like they should be simple are much more complicated. That goes for all areas of the universe really. In any public situation if something is wrong/broken/delayed/etc there will be somebody there saying these people are idiots and it's so simple, but in practice it's almost never that simple.

Derezo

I encountered bugs with kdenlive piecing together some travel videos, but it did the job. I did waste a lot of time in one project. There were more than 50 clips, most only about 10 seconds long. Spent a few hours getting the order and all the transitions right. At some point I needed to move a large group of clips ahead to add a new clip up front. I used CTRL+Click to select them. I have a HiDPI 4k display and I think when I CTRL+Clicked one of the clips I dragged a pixel or two, so it copied all of the clips and transitions but the copies weren't being displayed in the timeline. I continued working and didn't realize the problem for some time, and when I rendered it everything was messed up and out of place. When I closed kdenlive and opened it back up again all of the copied clips appeared. It took a long time to fix it.... :-/

NiteHackr

VLC from version 2 and 3 has had the same, terrible, annoying, application-breaking bug.

I tried VLC out, didn't like it at all. I have been spoiled with Media Player Classic. Works well, has some nice resizing features I have set up, alt+enter goes fullscreen etc... VLC may have similar keys, but I am used to MPC. Never had any issues with it in my memory.

Edgar Reynaldo

Media Player is not a video editor, which means it doesn't count for this.

Aaron Bolyard

I love open source, I can fix bugs and modify behavior on my own even if the dev doesn't do squat.

Get good. ;D

NiteHackr

Media Player is not a video editor, which means it doesn't count for this.

Except he was talking about VLC which is a video PLAYER not an editor, so yeah, Media Player does count and I wasn't replying to YOUR message anyhow!

Edgar Reynaldo

Which makes it even further off topic. Thanks.::)

Chris Katko

Sometimes I feel like we're not having a shared conversation, but a bunch of separate personal conversations with ourselves...

Edgar Reynaldo

If we're not careful we might end up talking to ourselves...

video

Chris Katko

Sigh... Oh look, yet another broken feature. So i'm stuck re-encoding my videos for speedups/slowdowns by using FFMPEG command line commands. Then I go to my project and it's not working with keyframes on certain clips.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0f_24LebM0E

First clip follows like it should. Second clip DOES NOT.

p.s. I have the worst freakin' luck getting A.CC to actually PREVIEW damn youtube links.

NiteHackr

Sometimes I feel like we're not having a shared conversation, but a bunch of separate personal conversations with ourselves...

Nah, just Edgar being an asshat as usual.

Edgar Reynaldo

You are way too sensitive for someone who frequents the internet. :/

Gideon Weems

Sometimes I feel like we're not having a shared conversation, but a bunch of separate personal conversations with ourselves...

I have been sensing this on the intranet lately. It's interesting that you would sense it here. Perhaps my expectations of meat-to-meat interaction are too high.

Chris Katko

I've had even MORE "game breaking" bugs from Kdenlive.

Version 18.x.x.

You would THINK that with a professional website and a version number of 18 in the major series, would be some sort of stable project for the most common things.

Nope.

Keyframes in zoom-position (essential) get corrupted every time you save and reload.

Speed up/down clips break every time you save/load.

Note: Every time it CRASHES means you have to reload! So good luck doing everything in a single binge.

I've wasted at least a dozen hours diagnosing and fixing errors for a TEN MINUTE project.

And I'm using the "recommended" "stable" version. The bleeding edge git one also crashes like crazy.

Edgar Reynaldo

I have the crazy feeling you should try some different software...

bamccaig

Keyframes in zoom-position (essential) get corrupted every time you save and reload.

Have you attempted to report the issue to the developers or reach support channels? This does seem like a pretty blatant issue. You'd expect either the project is unstable and they'd recommend you not use it unless you're helping to develop it, or maybe you've come across some edge case bug with particular formats and/or dependency versions that requires somebody to report it before they'll know it exists. You definitely cannot assume that because something is free and is presented well that it's popular and stable. Maybe they have a pro Web developer, and the product dev team is newbie. Or maybe the project was once stable and popular, but has since fallen to a better open source option (like OpenShot), and lost the lead developers that made it work in the first place. Open source plays by different rules than proprietary software. Even if it was popular and worked well at one time, it could be hobbling along and basically abandoned at this point. I'm sure anybody trying Allegro 5.0 out felt the same (but I think 5.2+ is stable af). ;)

I've wasted at least a dozen hours diagnosing and fixing errors for a TEN MINUTE project.

That's just poor time management. ;)

Chris Katko
bamccaig said:

That's just poor time management. ;)

I'm including the time I spent on forums searching, and posting, trying to isolate the problem and find workarounds, installing different versions (newer minor version, bleeding edge, all of which apparently CANNOT be installed concurrently and will corrupt the old versions because there's only one registry folder) the time I spent making a YouTube clip, uploading it, and sending it to the devs for a bug report. Which, btw, requires a separate login registration and is not really suitable for non-developers at all.

Basically, once you've put 40+ hours into a project, you don't want to literally throw it out and start over so you keep trying to fix it. Especially with open source software because I care about it. But if someone thinks I'm going to start looking through millions of lines of code that I have no experience with to fix a bug, they're crazy! ;)

I have the crazy feeling you should try some different software...

REALLY?!?!?!?!?! ;) ;) ;)

My next project will be using a different software package. Now I'm just trying to finish this crap and get it out the door.

This is what I get for supporting open source. >:( I did initial tests of the software before and it seemed fine but I never got into the nitty gritty of frame-per-frame adjusted effects and motion. And again, it doesn't show up till you start saving/loading so you can do tons of work before you come back and go "wait, what?"

I'm just gonna suck it up and try Adobe Premiere most likely. Although, Adobe is such a piece of !@$!@ that it doesn't support MKV format natively. ... even though MKV is just holding an MP4 video stream. ... and they support stupid formats like MPE and WMV. But hey, "professionals" don't use it yet (because they're dumb), so why support a modern, open-source format that has the incredibly useful feature of being progressively encoded so that if the device runs out of space / power-goes-out (a "streamable" format), the entire video is still playable and not corrupted? WHY SUPPORT THAT? I can't imagine a use case for such a format!

But you know what Adobe Premiere can do? EDIT A FREAKING VIDEO. Otherwise millions of users wouldn't be buying it. So I guess I'll be converting my terabytes of MKV files... to MP4. Luckily, since it's literally the same codec, I can do it with FFMPEG without doing any actual re-encoding (and therefor quality loss).

[edit]

BTW, YouTube is basically the Devil when it comes to quality. 1080p looks like butt sauce once hosted compared to my original sources. I do all this work to get it crisp and YT just mushes it out to nothingness. Like my eyes aged 15 years overnight. I might try upscaling to 1440p or 4K if just to allow people to run a higher bitrate on YT.

NiteHackr

You are way too sensitive for someone who frequents the internet. :/

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bamccaig

Basically, once you've put 40+ hours into a project, you don't want to literally throw it out and start over so you keep trying to fix it. Especially with open source software because I care about it.

This is what I get for supporting open source. >:(

I hate open source.

Could have fooled me. :-/

We all need to rant sometimes, but compared to the alternative, I'd rather free software that affords me the freedom to do everything I could ever dream of doing with it even if it barely works; instead of proprietary software that I can't afford that forbids me from doing the things I want to do. >:( It can be frustrating when something looks promising and doesn't solve the problem, but it's a lot less frustrating when you didn't pay anything for it (and didn't have to break any laws in doing so).

Chris Katko

You know I'm kidding, right?

I was just venting my frustration. Pretty sure I even mentioned that. I wouldn't have even Google'd for Kdenlive if I didn't love open source.

bamccaig

I would certainly conclude that from all these years on the boards, but I don't think it has been made clear (particularly for newbies or outsiders). It seems every time you say that you support open source in this thread you contradict it by saying that you hate it and it's a waste of time. :D And that might end up ultimately harming open source if it steers people away. And I don't think that was your intention.

Edgar Reynaldo

I love open source but if it doesn't have a professional quality or at least a standard of not crashing all the time then what's it worth?

If I have to spend all my time fixing my tools then I lose time programming my applications.

and then there's s*** like QT that works great till you have to buy a f****** license.

NiteHackr

I love open source. I found many good quality open source apps. Also found many paid apps that crash. But open source tends to be safer in the end.

I haven't found many open source projects I disliked. If one app doesn't work well, I keep searching for one that does.

If you need something bad enough, it may be time to pay for it.

bamccaig

I love open source but if it doesn't have a professional quality or at least a standard of not crashing all the time then what's it worth?

You're holding it to an unfair standard. You're basically saying, "ALL open source has to be perfect so it's like a few really well maintained proprietary products that I use."

"Well, what about the proprietary software you've used that is shit?"

"That doesn't count [somehow]."

::) ::) ::)

There is plenty of free software/open source that is "professional quality". It does a damn good job of competing with billion dollar corporations, and often times destroys them. For example, the Internet is pretty much built on free software.

There is plenty of proprietary software that is shit. We've all experienced it. You're effectively arguing with blinders on. You're living in a fantasy world if you think proprietary software is generally good quality. The majority of it is complete shit. It doesn't do what you really want to do, it often fails to do relatively simple things effectively (even when there's a billion dollar corporation behind it), and it's full of security vulnerabilities that allow clever crackers to just break your computer from afar.

Sure, free software is full of bugs too, but they're open about them, and anybody is free to study the code, discover them, and fix them. Whereas proprietary software is limited to however many developers the company can afford to pay to maintain it. It's only profitable to fix vulnerabilities that are critical or are well enough publicized to cause public relations turmoil so they won't even necessarily fix vulnerabilities that they know about. Guess who wins in the real world most of the time?

Edgar Reynaldo

My main and only point was that quality is more important than quantity.

try reading a little less into what I say next time.

Chris Katko

Yeah, I'm (OMG.) with Edgar. I think you over-read into it. I think we're all actually on the same page here. It's that strange psychological concept where you assume your words are in good faith (because the are), but assume the worst possible connotation/implication in someone else's words. (And, honestly, with the way the media/politics works these days, it probably bleeds in from that and makes us suspicious of normal every day conversations.)

But back to the point, I think we're all basically of the cloth: "Open source rules, but it's frustrating when an OS project fails to meet our basic usability or bug-squashing expectations."

There's actually a lot of flavors or classifications of open source projects. Groups of clusters. (ala:)

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You've got tiny 1 or 3 liner bash scripts someone posts online with zero comments or support.

You've got tons of small-to-medium projects with a single developer.

Plenty of projects that were worked on (and well-developed) but and then burned out and are no longer supported by anyone.

And yes, open-source does give you the option of picking up where someone left off. That DOES happen in some places like Dosbox. (There are many forks with random patches) But very... very... very few of those actually happen. Most projects just die and stay dead.

Another way to die is the main authors either leave, or become too busy to be full-time/active, so anyone left with the project is too scared to touch large portions of the code (like when I was doing shader development on Dolphin at the time--which has subsequently gotten much better).

bamccaig

Most projects just die and stay dead.

Usually for good reason though. Either there just isn't enough interest in maintaining it, or the technical debt is too great to pay off, or there's already something better out there to work with/on instead. Or perhaps just nobody with the needed skills/motivation/need wants to work on it.

If there's enough interest in a project then it should never die. There will either be enough volunteers to keep it going, or enough financial backing to afford a development team. If the project is dying it likely means it isn't needed, or at least didn't do a good enough job to fill the need. For example, with kdenlive, in your short-lived experience it has several critical flaws. It's difficult for a project like that to get support from the community. It isn't enough mature enough to satisfy basic requirements. Most people wouldn't even invest as much time as you did in it.

Ultimately, software is in a way like a living organism. It must adapt to its environment or it will die. Quite literally meaning typically software will break as its ecosystem changes, and unless it is continuously maintained to keep up it will eventually rot and die. Of course, the more robust it gets over time the more resilient it gets to changes in its ecosystem, but occasionally the ecosystem changes so much that everything breaks and the software either becomes half functional, useless, or gets patched to work again. The more complicated the software the more likely it is to break, and the more changes are needed to adapt it to its new surroundings. Some software needs to be constantly maintained to keep up with the changing ecosystem(s). Other software just needs the occasional weekend hacks to get working again.

My main and only point was that quality is more important than quantity.

And you could have just said that, and it would have been understood and agreed with. Instead, you implied that open source software is worthless because not only is it unpolished, but it doesn't even run. Which is just misleading. There are tiny, outlier projects like that in both open and closed source, but they're certainly not the standard. Why say what you said if you don't believe it to be the case? And if it's not the case then what you said is completely irrelevant to the conversation. I fail to understand how I'm misread what you wrote. I can't imagine how you could expect somebody to interpret what you said originally (unprofessional, crashing all the time) to be what you said afterward (quality is more important than quantity).

And I think it goes without saying. Who would possibly argue the reverse? It's nonsense. Ultimately, if your goal is to support open source (which I gather it is) then you should be careful how you criticize it because there are a lot of adversaries to open source and they don't need any help. There's nothing wrong with saying a project is shit. Lots of projects are shit. Just don't generalize it to the entire catalogue/movement.

Edgar Reynaldo

::)

We were talking about open source software that doesn't work. All I did was express how frustrating that is. Same as Chris did. We aren't proprietary software nazis trying to dissuade you from using your FLOSS. Chill out.

bamccaig

::)

So I guess it isn't frustrating when proprietary software suffers from the same problems.

Edgar Reynaldo

The difference is that most proprietary software has already passed most basic quality checks otherwise they couldn't charge for it (or at least continue to charge for it). :/

Peter Hull

Some books are undeservedly forgotten; none are undeservedly remembered.

Same for OSS - some good projects are abandoned before their time?

bamccaig

The difference is that most proprietary software has already passed most basic quality checks otherwise they couldn't charge for it (or at least continue to charge for it). :/

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:) :D :D ;D ;D ;D ;D ::)

Edgar Reynaldo

Youre an idiot bamccaig.

Aaron Bolyard

inkscape vs adobe illustrator

gimp vs adobe photoshop

blender vs maya

I use the former but there's no doubt the latter are better, more polished, easer-to-use products.

bamccaig

Then why do you use the former?

Aaron Bolyard

I don't have the money to spend on these other products.

Doctor Cop

I would use the former because they run on low-end machines.
Except for gimp, it's heavy.

GullRaDriel

"The difference is that most proprietary software has already passed most basic quality checks otherwise they couldn't charge for it (or at least continue to charge for it)"

You never had to be the sysadmin, have you really ?

Because if it was he case you clearly would not state something like this. I work in a +10000 computers company (just the users, not the DCs) for more than 15 years and what I can say from all that experience is that the proprietary softwares are not high quality checked.

Examples:
1) microsoft windows (patch Tuesday baby, reboot like you want !)
2) network admin proprietary dashboards like HP, Cisco, Orange, Juniper, Checkpoint, Aruba (sic)
3) AIX. Search for what is that shit and you'll understand, knowing that one server is a 1000000 euros bill a few years ago
4) VMware ... you never know how fucked it is until you use it in production and under load. With a single VM I was able to kill the whole ESX (without knowing it until its death)
5) Any new game coming out crash on most old computers because they do not check correctly a tons of things (video memory space, even some do not check ogl or dx version and just... crash). Yes I have a grudge against Farcry5.

Please also keep in mind that I do not value the FOSS that high. Not much than the average proprietary software. For me both are equals in terms of quality, except that when it's FOSS I can dig inside and fix it.

NiteHackr

Some free/opensource software I have used that I love and works well...

- IrfanView (image viewer, editor)
- Blender (amazing 3D)
- OpenShot Video Editor
- OBS Studio (video recording)
- GIMP (Photoshop quality image editor/creator)
- Code::Blocks (programming IDE)
- MinGW (compiler)
- Allegro (programming library)
- SDL (programming library)
- DOSBOX (DOS emulator)
- Vice64 (C64 emulator)
- Tile Studio (2D tile/map editor)
- MakeHuman (creates 3D human models for Blender etc)
- AwesomeBump (3D bump map editor)
- Materialize (3D material editor/normal maps etc...)
- Format Factory (converts between many many different video formats, audio formats etc)
- Audacity (audio editor/creator)

...the list is quite lengthy. I rarely have problems with any of these.

Edgar Reynaldo

I agree, there is plenty of great open source software out there, and it still competes with proprietary software, and that's great.

NiteHackr

Oh, and probably the biggest open source of all... LINUX and the numerous apps for it.

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